New Book Alert: The President is Missing

The feels!!!!

If this isn’t something to look forward to, I don’t know what is. It takes knowing both writers from their previous works and their individual influences.This promises to be the mother of political thrillers. I can’t wait to write a review or see the movie.

Barely released and already topping the charts.
How does this book make you feel?

Health Tip: Nourish valuable relationships. Let them flourish. Mend broken bridges, don’t burn them.
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📅OumissaInspire
Lagos,Nigeria
120718
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Book Review #7

Title : The Body Politic

Author: Catherine Aird

Publisher: Doubleday

Year: 1990

Source: Borrowed

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What do Old English battle re-enactments, a fatal road accident and a Middle Eastern country rich in a rare mineral have in common?

The death of a British expatriate.

The entire book is one giant unfolding mystery. You follow the Detective Inspector Sloan as he unravels whether it is natural causes or murder. Aird weaves threads of classical poetry, medicine, life in the English countryside, politics, international relations, history into this tale. The thick suspense holds up till the very end. When the villain is revealed , it will not be your best guess.

I found this book hard to follow at some point but curiosity kept me going in addition to being familiar with many of the themes. This may also be due to the fact that it was written almost three decades ago and roughly set within that period. Insight- when the doctors talk about smallpox being eradicated and AIDS popping up not too long after.

In all, it is the kind of book that will improve your knowledge asides enjoying the plot.

Have you read this book? What was your experience like? I’d love to hear your views.

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OumissaInspire

Lagos, Nigeria

170418

About The Cartographer of Memory

Title: The Cartographers of Memory
Author: Boluwatife Afolabi
Publisher: SankofaMag
Year: 2017
Source: @thereadclub ( they have something exciting coming up)

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An anthology of poems that confronts the horrid things we do to ourselves and others. Main themes are love, grief and violence. Despite the best efforts of my English teachers, I am still not good at understanding poetry and I had to read some of them twice.

This form of writing is unique in that the writer can portray their imagination in real and abstract illustration but can still manage to bring relevant truths to light. It however demands discerning thought on the part of the reader.

This picture takes me back to the time I spent with two kind souls @ghaniyah_adetayo and Barakah. They spoilt me with food, treats and more when i needed it the most and gave me some of the best moments this year. Thank you both very much. May Allah grant you the very best of what you seek. They provided the props.

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I am not a chef by any standard but when a recipe pops into my mind ,I will make some art with it. ( May spare a bite or two for you if I am in a generous mood.)

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This spaghetti, dodo(fried plantain) and pepper sauce was packed for office lunch. Believe me, it was delightfully tasty. There has to be a natural band around my stomach that prevents me from eating large portions. I like to think this keeps me in better health. Some of my less kind friends call me a chicken as a result. May Allah forgive them. I still love them though.

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Have you read this book?
What are your thoughts about poetry? Any particular works that have shaped you?
What do you like to include in your book photos? Stationery, food,coffee, marbletops, nature?
Looking forward to your replies.

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Oumissa
Lagos, Nigeria
Thur, 21 Dec 2017

Review: Paper Trails by Pete Dexter

Title: Paper Trails

Author: Peter Dexter

Year: 2007

Publisher: HarperCollinsPublisher

Source: @aeesha_t

This collection of stories is a compilation of the author’s newspaper columns in the 70s and 80s. Some of the stories give an interesting insight into his childhood, wife, child and pets. Others explore ordinary American lives of the time. He presents evil nature of man in a non-judgemental way, as something we all are capable of. Race, law, education,journalism, healthcare and other vital societal issues are also discussed in a way that puts the human first.

Dexter’s writing is so vivid and compelling. It was an illuminating read. Even though it took some time to settle into it, it became a pageturner towards the end.

My January 2018 TBR

I want to read them all but I have only an ebook of Men without Women by Haruki Murakami.

I am expecting the first three from a special person. She has been an amazing soul from the first day I met her. I can’t wait for our kids to play together. Don’t worry, you would get to know her in my subsequent blog posts.

Okay so far I hope number 2 arrives so I can join @theguywiththebook in his group read. I hope @sumaiyya.books would be there too.

That leaves me with Into the Water by Paula Hawkins, The Hate You Give by Angie Thomas and I Am Never Talking to White People About Race. Hope to get all of these books before the month runs out. (being a booklover is so capital intensive!)

This seven came out of a very long list of amazing books i made with help from @hassanah_t and @bookminimalist

I guess I have to take them small small.

I will be writing about how each of these books have been on my mind for a while now. Some of them made the @goodreads list of 2017 best books. I look forward to reading all of them.

Now tell me, what is special about these books to you you interested in a co-read?
Feel free to share and comment.

-Oumissa

#3 : Stay With Me- Ayòbámi Adébáyò

 

 ​The àmì on the author’s name made me translate the title into Yoruba subconsciously and there! I got a loose idea of what the book was centred on – Àbíkú.

However , nothing prepares you for the twists and turns, the suspense and carefully woven tapestry of this work, the ending that is as unexpected as it is beautiful. All of this makes Stay With Me such a fantastic piece.

The plot mirrors common but rarely discussed experiences. In it, you are made to feel the pressure, frustration and all other emotions of a childless couple in 80’s South West Nigeria.

You feel the pain of betrayal, the rawness of deception, the calculation and misguided love in the ties connecting Akin and Yejide to Funmi, Dotun, Moomi and other characters. Witnessing the  darkest side of each’s persona still does not make you judge them. Such is the candour of Ayòbámi’s presentation.

Perhaps what made this book so striking is the familiarity of the setting.

It is amazing how the author manages to incorporate so many themes in a concise and enjoyable read. Among them are life in Nigeria’s military era; escaping poverty to middle class through education; retaining core aspects of cultural heritage nonetheless; dedication and sacrifice of mothers; sickle cell disease and mental health.

It provides insight into the overwhelming importance placed on having biological children, how this leads to desperation, unforseen circumstances and uncontrollable consequences that defy best laid plans. Societal expectations are seen to be more stringent on women. Even self-proclaimed feminists are not spared.

P.S I would love to know more about Akin. For me, he was the most layered and interesting character.

20 Facts to a Score

To all the wonderful people that take time out to read this blog, I say thank you. For some reason, the facts were held up for a while. I sincerely apologise for the uneasy suspense.

FACT 7
I enjoy reading.

I became fascinated with books early on in life. At first, I couldn’t make out the big words but I still read them anyway.
It was a normal thing for me to exhaust all the school books in my English Literature list before the term began. At the sound of Father’s car horn, we all would rush outside screaming excitedly,”Daddy! Oyoyo!” in anticipation of goodies. I always found a way to outsmart the others and run off with the newspaper. Then I would spend the next two hours poring over each page. My favourites were the articles about politics and science.
Schoolbooks were not my forte. I studied them just enough to earn good grades. However, I read novels long into the night by the light reflecting from the hallway. This opened the doors to an enchanting world where I shared adventures with the numerous characters in my novels.
It was kind of weird reading ‘big books with no pictures’ while others read illustrated children books.What many of my peers didn’t know was that Father discouraged me from watching too much television. When I was eight, he gave me a present – Collins’ Children’s Encyclopaedia. I learnt a lot about the world and was imbued with so much information. Thus at a young age I could reason along with adults.
Often, my teachers would catch me reading novels in class. I only found more clever ways to read them in class. There was this informal book club in school. You get to borrow a book only if you read fast. It didn’t take long for me to get any book I wanted.
Any time I came across a good book, I wished I could write like the author.
Reading became a form of relaxation and a source of comfort. It widened the horizon of my imagination and made me think a lot about things around me.This made schoolwork less boring and easy to understand. The books, articles and magazines I read were about art, culture, science, adventure,religion, politics,romance, business,detective stories, geography and many other topics. As I grew older, I lost interest in romance novels and read more of religious literature.

At breakfast, I would peruse the tin of Milo and milk or the packets of cereal. Till today, all the vitamins and minerals are stuck in my head along with their metabolic functions.

The first part of the Qur’an revealed was, ” Read! In the Name of your Lord Who has created (all that exists). {Q96v1}. There is an Hadith(saying of the Prophet {S.A.W.}) that goes thus, ” Seeking knowledge is mandatory upon every Muslim male and female.”
Sadly, almost nobody reads anymore.I think more leaders should read books with children. Let’s learn to love reading . It is the key to national development. The government should budget a lot more for education and revamp our libraries. Parents should make their children see that reading can be fun. This is essential as the literacy level of a people determines their level of development.
Readers become leaders, writers and thinkers. As Father rightly said, ‘The mind that reads retains the sharpness of youth’. Let’s join hands to revive the reading culture. We’d be better for it as a nation.